Review: My Grandfather’s Great War

August 20, 2008

My Grandfather’s Great WarUnderbelly

star 

“I find all war an abomination,” states Cameron Stewart in this thought-provoking solo journey though his grandfather’s First World War dairies. Stewart exudes the firm but warm air of a prep school headmaster and unmistakably has the military in his genes. This show follows a familiar formula, sections of diaries interspersed with personal commentary. It appears wildly un-cool but endearingly decent – the sort of thing that belongs on Radio 4 and it’s nice to do the ironing to. Read more

Review: Face in the Crowd

August 20, 2008

Face in the CrowdIron Belly

star

The cramped, dank space of Underbelly’s Iron Belly gives an apposite sweaty backdrop to a piece of physical theatre which begins and ends on London’s tube. Face in the Crowd, presented by theatre ensemble company Kudos, lays bare the frenetic groundhog day that befalls most city workers trapped in the rat race. Read more

Review: Lough/Rain

August 20, 2008

Lough/RainUnderbelly

star

Lough/Rain offers up an unusual double bill, with what essentially amounts to two separate plays which tell the same story. Written by Declan Feenan and Clara Brennan respectively, the two part piece charts the relationship of a young couple struck by tragic circumstance. Read more

Review: Surviving Spike

August 20, 2008

Michael Barrymore as Spike MilliganAssembly @ George Street

star

He was one of the great eccentrics of British comedy, his humour coming from a place that few understood, and no one would seek to copy. But that’s enough about Michael Barrymore. This is a play about the turbulent life of Spike Milligan, genius comic writer, womanizer, manic depressive and much-loved oddball. Read more

Review: Wanderlust

August 20, 2008

HildaUnderbelly

star

Ten foot tall powerhouse Hilda takes us on a magical and sometimes eerie journey through her life in the circus. Combining circus, cabaret, puppets, marionettes, clubbing and vodka, this must be the most out-of-the-ordinary fun I’ve had at this year’s festival. Wanderlust is a multi-sensory, total audience participation piece. A sharp-witted and enthralling experience at times, if a quite utterly bizarre and out of body experience at others. Read more

Review: Potted Pirates

August 20, 2008

Potted PiratesPleasance Courtyard

star

This piratical parody, from the team behind recent monster hit Potted Potter, is sizzling with hearty buccaneer banter and general ‘piratitude’ and deserves no less success than its predecessor. Read more

Review: The Bird & the Bee: The Bird

August 20, 2008

The Bird & the Bee: The BirdUnderbelly

star

Chloe and Jacob are beautifully in love. The first time they meet, they end their lives…this is Jacob’s story.

I sit eagerly in a dark, dank industrial auditorium, which suits perfectly the mood of the story that unfolds in front of me, hoping to learn exactly what drove a young boy to seek his kindred spirit over the Internet and make a pact to end his life. Read more

Review: The Terrible Infants

August 20, 2008

The Terrible InfantsUdderbelly’s Pasture

star

Following on from their successes at last year’s fringe and nationally, Les Enfants Terribles present this self-titled piece which occupies its own little niche somewhere between straight-up children’s storytellers and a slapstick band of travelling performers, all with a dark, Tim Burton-influenced fairytale ambience. The audience is treated to a selection of yarns, interspersed with all sorts of horseplay and the occasional knees-up musical interlude. Read more

Review: The Aluminium Show

August 20, 2008

The Aluminium Showstar

Pleasance Courtyard (Venue 33)

The idea behind this is fairly simple, and the clue is in the title. Six performers bounce around the stage, cavorting with aluminium foil in all its guises, creating a fun, playful show for all the family. Read more

Review: Free Outgoing

August 20, 2008

Free Outgoingstar

Traverse (Venue 15)
This production deserves recognition in several areas. A pioneering work from Chennai-based playwright (Anupama Chandrasekhar – making her UK debut) it depicts the controversial and heartbreaking story of how a daughter’s misstep in love leads to the collapse of her family’s entire world. The material is new, exciting and profound, which makes its rather clodhopping execution something of a disappointment. Read more

« Previous PageNext Page »